Study on Discrimnation Against Transgender Persons Based in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor (Right to Education, Employment, Health Care, Housing and Dignity)

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This report is relevant to development and humanitarian practitioners as it outlines the experiences of discrimination faced by transgender people in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor. It offers six recommendations to improve the protection of the rights of the transgender community in Malaysia.

This report examines the types of discrimination faced by transgender people in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor and how the rights of transgender people have been violated. The research focused on the experiences of transgender people in relation to their right to education, employment, health care, housing and dignity. The research sought to use the findings to develop strategies to protect the human rights of the transgender community.

The research involved interviews with 100 transgender people between 18-70 years of age. The research found that all participants had experienced some form of discrimination directly as a result of their gender identity and expression. Experiences of harassment, abuse and violence were common and were perpetrated by both individuals and state authorities. Respondents faced challenges in having their identity recognised and further had issues accessing public services, including health care and education.

Following the introduction to the study, chapter two looks at both domestic legal frameworks and international human rights frameworks and how they relate to transgender people. Chapter three presents the findings and analysis on the five rights studied, namely: the right to education, employment, health care, housing and dignity. Chapter four then offers six recommendations based on the study’s findings.

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“The Commission’s stand is clear that steps must be taken to uphold their rights as human beings and protect them against any discrimination, harm and violence. The Commission would like to reiterate that all human beings, regardless of their sexual orientation, shall enjoy a full range of human rights.”

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This report examines the types of discrimination faced by transgender people in Kuala Lumpur and Selangor and how the rights of transgender people have been violated. The research focused on the experiences of transgender people in relation to their right to education, employment, health care, housing and dignity. The research sought to use the findings to develop strategies to protect the human rights of the transgender community.

The research involved interviews with 100 transgender people between 18-70 years of age. The research found that all participants had experienced some form of discrimination directly as a result of their gender identity and expression. Experiences of harassment, abuse and violence were common and were perpetrated by both individuals and state authorities. Respondents faced challenges in having their identity recognised and further had issues accessing public services, including health care and education.

Following the introduction to the study, chapter two looks at both domestic legal frameworks and international human rights frameworks and how they relate to transgender people. Chapter three presents the findings and analysis on the five rights studied, namely: the right to education, employment, health care, housing and dignity. Chapter four then offers six recommendations based on the study’s findings.