Developing Actionable Research Priorities for LGBTI Inclusion

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This academic article is relevant for development and humanitarian practitioners as it clearly outlines the current gaps in data on LGBTI inclusion and highlights the priority areas for future research.

This academic article highlights which areas of research should be prioritised to promote LGBTI inclusion. The article notes the distinct lack of data across the world on the lives and experiences of LGBTI people, particularly in relation to their human rights. The authors consulted with activists and researchers and examined reports, including the findings of the UNDP LGBTI Inclusion index consultation process in order to establish a list of research priorities to further LGBTI inclusion in the areas of health, education, economics and political participation.

The authors note that research has already proved a powerful tool in advancing the human rights of LGBTI people in many countries and highlight cases of the use of such research. For example, they highlight that research demonstrating that LGBTI parents raise healthy children has assisted litigation on child custody laws and marriage equality. In section two of the article the authors discuss how national and global data that already exists but is underused could be used by researchers and policy makers to address some of the current gaps in knowledge on LGBTI inclusion. In section three the authors then outline the areas in which new data is required. Moreover, they discuss the need to construct global research infrastructure and suggest how such a framework could be established. Section four concludes the paper by offering a summary of what the long-term vision of a world-wide research framework and community on LGBTI inclusion could look like.

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“More data and research would provide a better assessment of the lived experience of LGBTI people around the world, supporting advocacy and providing evidence on a range of fronts. Human rights organizations would have new ways to monitor the inclusion of LGBTI people and the fulfillment of government obligations and commitments in relation to international human rights standards. Governments, civil society actors, development agencies, and other partners need more data to understand the link between LGBTI exclusion and sustainable development and to create evidence-based laws, policies, programming, and budgeting.”

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This academic article highlights which areas of research should be prioritised to promote LGBTI inclusion. The article notes the distinct lack of data across the world on the lives and experiences of LGBTI people, particularly in relation to their human rights. The authors consulted with activists and researchers and examined reports, including the findings of the UNDP LGBTI Inclusion index consultation process in order to establish a list of research priorities to further LGBTI inclusion in the areas of health, education, economics and political participation.

The authors note that research has already proved a powerful tool in advancing the human rights of LGBTI people in many countries and highlight cases of the use of such research. For example, they highlight that research demonstrating that LGBTI parents raise healthy children has assisted litigation on child custody laws and marriage equality. In section two of the article the authors discuss how national and global data that already exists but is underused could be used by researchers and policy makers to address some of the current gaps in knowledge on LGBTI inclusion. In section three the authors then outline the areas in which new data is required. Moreover, they discuss the need to construct global research infrastructure and suggest how such a framework could be established. Section four concludes the paper by offering a summary of what the long-term vision of a world-wide research framework and community on LGBTI inclusion could look like.