From Global Coordination to Local Strategies: A Practical Approach to Prevent, Address and Document Domestic Violence under COVID-19

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This resource is relevant for humanitarian and development practitioners working in prevention of and response to domestic violence, particularly during COVID-19. This resource provides evidence-based recommendations for creating and implementing effective programming in a socially distanced environment.

This briefing note is result of a collaboration between MADRE, Media Matters for Women, MenEngage Alliance, Nobel Women’s Initiative, OutRight Action International, Women Enabled International, and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) to consider practical approaches to prevent, address, and document domestic violence during COVID-19.

The note first outlines the specific challenges for domestic violence prevention and the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the drivers of violence while limiting accessibility of support services. The briefing note then moves into programmatic recommendations for local and national organisations that draw upon the collective expertise of numerous grassroots women’s organisations from around the world. These recommendations are specifically for socially distanced environments and include, for instance, bluetooth sharing, social media, and printed outreach materials.

Recommendations on preventing domestic violence; addressing domestic violence; and documenting domestic violence follow before a section of recommendations for governments, UN agencies and international organisations.

An intersectional approach is used throughout the briefing note, specifically drawing upon the work and experience of LGBTIQ+ organisations, using examples such as secure chat access for LGBTIQ+ youth in quarantine and in need of counselling; documenting whether survivors are members of the LGBTIQ+ community; and funding intersectionally relevant services that include tailored projects for LGBTIQ and gender non-conforming persons.

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"While prevention programs and direct services for domestic violence survivors have increased, few programs have been systematically evaluated to assess what works and for which survivors, including persons with disabilities, members of the LGBITQ community or members of other marginalized groups."

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This briefing note is result of a collaboration between MADRE, Media Matters for Women, MenEngage Alliance, Nobel Women’s Initiative, OutRight Action International, Women Enabled International, and Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) to consider practical approaches to prevent, address, and document domestic violence during COVID-19.

The note first outlines the specific challenges for domestic violence prevention and the ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated the drivers of violence while limiting accessibility of support services. The briefing note then moves into programmatic recommendations for local and national organisations that draw upon the collective expertise of numerous grassroots women’s organisations from around the world. These recommendations are specifically for socially distanced environments and include, for instance, bluetooth sharing, social media, and printed outreach materials.

Recommendations on preventing domestic violence; addressing domestic violence; and documenting domestic violence follow before a section of recommendations for governments, UN agencies and international organisations.

An intersectional approach is used throughout the briefing note, specifically drawing upon the work and experience of LGBTIQ+ organisations, using examples such as secure chat access for LGBTIQ+ youth in quarantine and in need of counselling; documenting whether survivors are members of the LGBTIQ+ community; and funding intersectionally relevant services that include tailored projects for LGBTIQ and gender non-conforming persons.