The Women, Peace and Security Agenda and its implications for LGBTIQ people

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This resource is relevant for civil society organisations, activists and other diverse SOGIESC advocates and allies interested in engaging with the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda, or who are interested in promoting the rights of the diverse SOGIESC community through UN Security Council mechanisms.

This report opens with a brief overview of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda including its adoption and the reasons UNSCR 1325 is so important in the international development and humanitarian sector. The report then moves into an overview of the UN Security Council and why it matters–as well as offering ways in which LGBTIQ groups can be involved and heard. A short section on LGBTIQ access to the Security Council–historically limited due to devaluation of civil society by the UN–identifies the ways LGBTIQ advocacy and rights groups can engage with the Security Council. Arria Formula meetings are specifically discussed.

The role of the NGO Working Group (NGOWG) on WPS is then discussed, including its make-up and membership. The opportunities for engagement during WPS week (during October every year) are identified with examples of past previous successes. The final mechanisms included in this report is engaging with National Action Plans and Regional Action Plans; Civil Society Reviews, and tactics for pressuring UN representatives to include LGBTIQ security in WPS implementation plans.

A final section on Beijing+25 and the significance of 2020 concludes the substantive sections of the report. This report provides specific and practical advice for engaging with the UN Security Council and WPS Agenda for LGBTIQ inclusion.

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"While the BPfA lacks explicit mention of LGBTIQ experiences, its overall objective is towards gender equality. At the root of all of the BPfA’s objectives is the resistance to gender-based norms, restrictions, and overall violence. LGBTIQ people are disproportionately affected by gender inequality because of the deeply ingrained gender norms they do not fit into, and even challenge, by their very existence."

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This report opens with a brief overview of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda including its adoption and the reasons UNSCR 1325 is so important in the international development and humanitarian sector. The report then moves into an overview of the UN Security Council and why it matters–as well as offering ways in which LGBTIQ groups can be involved and heard. A short section on LGBTIQ access to the Security Council–historically limited due to devaluation of civil society by the UN–identifies the ways LGBTIQ advocacy and rights groups can engage with the Security Council. Arria Formula meetings are specifically discussed.

The role of the NGO Working Group (NGOWG) on WPS is then discussed, including its make-up and membership. The opportunities for engagement during WPS week (during October every year) are identified with examples of past previous successes. The final mechanisms included in this report is engaging with National Action Plans and Regional Action Plans; Civil Society Reviews, and tactics for pressuring UN representatives to include LGBTIQ security in WPS implementation plans.

A final section on Beijing+25 and the significance of 2020 concludes the substantive sections of the report. This report provides specific and practical advice for engaging with the UN Security Council and WPS Agenda for LGBTIQ inclusion.