Disaggregating LGBTIQ Protection Concerns: Experiences of refugee communities in Nairobi

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This resource is relevant for humanitarian practitioners, especially those working with refugees and displaced communities, because of its focus on the experiences, protection needs of and the ways that the humanitarian system can support LGBTIQ refugees; this is one of few research reports that focuses entirely on LGBTIQ refugees. Importantly, this report includes specific information on intersex refugees, who are not often substantively considered in research on diverse SOGIESC populations.

This research report presents the findings of qualitative and quantitative research undertaken with LGBTIQ refugee community in Nairobi in 2016. The research aimed to understand the distinct protection needs of LBQ, MSM, trans, intersex, and unaccompanied minor communities and the interventions that are best suited to their needs; the role of humanitarian agencies in engendering empowerment and/or reinforcing negative structures in the LGBTIQ community; the effects of cash-based interventions as a protection tool; the ways in which agencies can support protection and self-reliance for this cohort; and, finally, how humanitarian agencies can improve on internal and external procedures to benefit the LGBTIQ refugee community.

The report opens with an overview of the global context for LGBTIQ persons and refugees, considering some of the challenges LGBTIQ refugees face. The paper then considers the local context in Uganda and Kenya before moving into a background on the research imperatives. The report then presents a background and some qualitative findings on the protection needs for each of the sub-groups (LBQ, MSM, trans, intersex, and unaccompanied minors), which are followed by recommendations for enhancing protection. The report then moves into targeted protection interventions, including cash based interventions, for LGBTIQ refugees. Each of these is followed by recommendations.

The report then presents findings on and recommendations for livelihoods support for each of the cohorts; community based organisations working with LGBTIQ refugees; promoting sound internal procedures for humanitarian agencies; and concluding with recommendations for the future.

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"...whilst the growth of refugee-led LGBTIQ CBOs is a positive development and contributes to the overall protection strategy of UNHCR, the leadership structures of these organisations are overwhelmingly led by MSM."

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This research report presents the findings of qualitative and quantitative research undertaken with LGBTIQ refugee community in Nairobi in 2016. The research aimed to understand the distinct protection needs of LBQ, MSM, trans, intersex, and unaccompanied minor communities and the interventions that are best suited to their needs; the role of humanitarian agencies in engendering empowerment and/or reinforcing negative structures in the LGBTIQ community; the effects of cash-based interventions as a protection tool; the ways in which agencies can support protection and self-reliance for this cohort; and, finally, how humanitarian agencies can improve on internal and external procedures to benefit the LGBTIQ refugee community.

The report opens with an overview of the global context for LGBTIQ persons and refugees, considering some of the challenges LGBTIQ refugees face. The paper then considers the local context in Uganda and Kenya before moving into a background on the research imperatives. The report then presents a background and some qualitative findings on the protection needs for each of the sub-groups (LBQ, MSM, trans, intersex, and unaccompanied minors), which are followed by recommendations for enhancing protection. The report then moves into targeted protection interventions, including cash based interventions, for LGBTIQ refugees. Each of these is followed by recommendations.

The report then presents findings on and recommendations for livelihoods support for each of the cohorts; community based organisations working with LGBTIQ refugees; promoting sound internal procedures for humanitarian agencies; and concluding with recommendations for the future.