Lost in Transition: Transgender People, Rights and HIV Vulnerability in the Asia-Pacific Region

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This report is relevant to development practitioners as it provides a detailed account of the health-related vulnerabilities faced by trans* people in the Asia-Pacific region. Additionally, the report offers a set of 11 recommendations for practitioners to follow when engaging in future research on HIV and trans* people.

This 76-page report examines in detail the current literature on the health-related vulnerabilities faced by trans* people in the Asia-Pacific region. The report focuses on the risks of contracting HIV and experiencing human rights abuses. All literature examined is from post-2000. The report analyses laws, policies and literature on local practices that influence the stigma faced by trans* people in the region which is considered to increase their vulnerability of contracting HIV.

The report opens by giving context to the experiences of trans* people in the Asia-Pacific region. Statistics on the number of trans* people in the region and the size of the HIV pandemic within the transgender community are discussed, however, the lack of precise research and data on the trans* population is considered one of the greatest barriers to addressing their vulnerabilities. The report then outlines the social, and legal factors effecting the marginalisation and discrimination of trans* individuals. The trans* population is considered a heterogeneous group and the experiences and vulnerabilities faced by trans* men and trans* women are considered separately. The author highlights the lack of appropriate and inclusive health-care services for trans* people in the region. The repot concludes with11 recommendations for future research addressing HIV vulnerability in the trans* community.

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"The failure to address trans* people’s sexual health needs is to some extent symptomatic of a more general failure extending across the broader sexual minority spectrum. However, it is also clear that throughout much of the history of the global HIV response, trans* people have been invisibilised; in that they have seldom been properly recognised as a distinct population for purposes of confronting the HIV pandemic."

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This 76-page report examines in detail the current literature on the health-related vulnerabilities faced by trans* people in the Asia-Pacific region. The report focuses on the risks of contracting HIV and experiencing human rights abuses. All literature examined is from post-2000. The report analyses laws, policies and literature on local practices that influence the stigma faced by trans* people in the region which is considered to increase their vulnerability of contracting HIV.

The report opens by giving context to the experiences of trans* people in the Asia-Pacific region. Statistics on the number of trans* people in the region and the size of the HIV pandemic within the transgender community are discussed, however, the lack of precise research and data on the trans* population is considered one of the greatest barriers to addressing their vulnerabilities. The report then outlines the social, and legal factors effecting the marginalisation and discrimination of trans* individuals. The trans* population is considered a heterogeneous group and the experiences and vulnerabilities faced by trans* men and trans* women are considered separately. The author highlights the lack of appropriate and inclusive health-care services for trans* people in the region. The repot concludes with11 recommendations for future research addressing HIV vulnerability in the trans* community.