Post-Disaster Needs Assessment: 2018 Floods, LAO PDR

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This resource is useful for practitioners looking to work in/already working in Laos because it provides a comprehensive overview of the country’s socio-cultural and economic environment and the associated impacts of three natural disasters in 2018.

The key findings of the post-disaster needs assessment are far-reaching. The assessment found that there are severe macroeconomic impacts, with total cost of the floods estimated at US$371 million; with significant damage to physical infrastructure and assets, and production losses in primarily agriculture, trade and transport services. Significant production losses in the private sector, and the loss of livelihoods contributing to emigration.

The report acknowledges that the floods compounded and exacerbated pre-existing inequalities faced by marginalised groups –such as overcrowded camps that lack protection for vulnerable groups. The report’s recovery strategy addresses short-term needs for women, children and people with disability. The report includes people of diverse gender identities and other marginalised groups as actors that will be able to affect Disaster Risk Management decisions in the longer-term. The report recognises Lao PDR’s lack of gender equality, and how gender-based issues are further compounded by intersections with other marginalised identities. The report notes that LGBTQI persons face discrimination within their communities and face barriers to attaining education and employment, and LGBTQI people with disabilities are further discriminated against.

The report provides detailed information on damages, losses and recovery strategies for the housing, education, health and nutrition, culture, agriculture, tourism, industry and commerce, transport, waterways, water supply and sanitation and electricity sectors. The report also identifies three cross-cutting issues: Governance, Unexploded ordnance, and Disaster risk management, environment and climate change adaptation.

The report concludes with an overview of the Disaster Recovery Framework, which compromises the following six components: Recovery Vision and Strategy Objectives, Reference to Policy Framework, Institutional Frameworks, Sector Plans, Finance and Financial Management, Implementation Arrangements.

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"Gender inequalities are prevalent in Lao PDR in formal and informal employment, access to financial services, and social and political participation. As a key example, although 25 percent of National Assembly members were female in 2017, barriers to women’s leadership remained at provincial and local levels, where women constituted only 6 percent of district mayors and 2.6 percent of village chiefs."

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The key findings of the post-disaster needs assessment are far-reaching. The assessment found that there are severe macroeconomic impacts, with total cost of the floods estimated at US$371 million; with significant damage to physical infrastructure and assets, and production losses in primarily agriculture, trade and transport services. Significant production losses in the private sector, and the loss of livelihoods contributing to emigration.

The report acknowledges that the floods compounded and exacerbated pre-existing inequalities faced by marginalised groups –such as overcrowded camps that lack protection for vulnerable groups. The report’s recovery strategy addresses short-term needs for women, children and people with disability. The report includes people of diverse gender identities and other marginalised groups as actors that will be able to affect Disaster Risk Management decisions in the longer-term. The report recognises Lao PDR’s lack of gender equality, and how gender-based issues are further compounded by intersections with other marginalised identities. The report notes that LGBTQI persons face discrimination within their communities and face barriers to attaining education and employment, and LGBTQI people with disabilities are further discriminated against.

The report provides detailed information on damages, losses and recovery strategies for the housing, education, health and nutrition, culture, agriculture, tourism, industry and commerce, transport, waterways, water supply and sanitation and electricity sectors. The report also identifies three cross-cutting issues: Governance, Unexploded ordnance, and Disaster risk management, environment and climate change adaptation.

The report concludes with an overview of the Disaster Recovery Framework, which compromises the following six components: Recovery Vision and Strategy Objectives, Reference to Policy Framework, Institutional Frameworks, Sector Plans, Finance and Financial Management, Implementation Arrangements.