Gender and Age Inequality of Disaster Risk

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This resource is relevant for humanitarian practitioners involved in DRR work, and for those involved in research; this article highlights an important missing part of disaster research through its focus on intersectionality.

This 84-page resource comprises three sections: (1) Gender and age inequality of disaster risk – global review, (2) case studies on differential impact, and (3) conclusions and recommendations. In the first section, the global review outlines the gaps and issues relating to a lack of disaggregated data by variables such as age, sex, gender, disability and income when looking at disaster risk.

The second section pertains to the differential impact of earthquakes in Nepal; floods, cyclones and drought in Malawi; and hurricanes in Dominica. The document uses literature review and targeted interviews to understand ‘the experiences of individuals who are rarely considered in policy or programming’, and who are overlooked in projects of preparedness or post-disaster needs assessments.

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“Data gaps excluding marginalized groups were apparent in all data sets, including at census level, meaning marginalized groups were often invisible in analysis, policy and practice.”

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This 84-page resource comprises three sections: (1) Gender and age inequality of disaster risk – global review, (2) case studies on differential impact, and (3) conclusions and recommendations. In the first section, the global review outlines the gaps and issues relating to a lack of disaggregated data by variables such as age, sex, gender, disability and income when looking at disaster risk.

The second section pertains to the differential impact of earthquakes in Nepal; floods, cyclones and drought in Malawi; and hurricanes in Dominica. The document uses literature review and targeted interviews to understand ‘the experiences of individuals who are rarely considered in policy or programming’, and who are overlooked in projects of preparedness or post-disaster needs assessments.