Gendering the MDGs Beyond 2015: Understanding Needs and Capacities of LGBTI Persons in Disasters and Emergencies

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This article is relevant for humanitarian and development practitioners because it uses a strengths-based approach to discuss the impacts of exclusion on LGBTI people and communities within the context of development practice.

This report argues that there is a mounting body of evidence that the exclusion and invisibility of LGBTI people in disaster and humanitarian research and planning has increased their experiences of violence and discrimination in these settings. Published in 2012, this report is pre-Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) era.

The authors first provide an overview of the existing work on this issue, citing the persistence of violations against LGBTI people despite the existence of new regulations. The experiences of LGBTI people in disasters and humanitarian settings is then discussed before delving into a review of the MDG framework and its benefits and drawbacks. The authors explore what it means to be vulnerable as an LGBTI person in a disaster context, and then discuss the resilience and immense capacities of LGBTI people and communities in these settings. The authors close by arguing that listening to the voices of LGBTI people and communities in global DRR planning is an imperative—and that the sector has much to learn from them.

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"During disasters and emergency situations, LGBTI persons are subjected to similar, if not increased, discriminatory practices and violence [during disasters]. Yet evidence has also shown that LGBTI persons, instead of being simply victims can be active agents who possess the capacity to self-organize and mobilize during disasters and emergencies."

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This report argues that there is a mounting body of evidence that the exclusion and invisibility of LGBTI people in disaster and humanitarian research and planning has increased their experiences of violence and discrimination in these settings. Published in 2012, this report is pre-Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) era.

The authors first provide an overview of the existing work on this issue, citing the persistence of violations against LGBTI people despite the existence of new regulations. The experiences of LGBTI people in disasters and humanitarian settings is then discussed before delving into a review of the MDG framework and its benefits and drawbacks. The authors explore what it means to be vulnerable as an LGBTI person in a disaster context, and then discuss the resilience and immense capacities of LGBTI people and communities in these settings. The authors close by arguing that listening to the voices of LGBTI people and communities in global DRR planning is an imperative—and that the sector has much to learn from them.