Sexual and gender minorities in disaster

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This article is relevant for humanitarian and development practitioners, especially those involved in DRR planning and response and those interested in bringing theoretical academic frameworks to their work.

This article considers the implications of the absence of sexual and gender minorities from DRR planning, research, and response literature. The article first provides an overview of the existing (limited) body of work on sexual and gender minority experiences in disaster settings, including work on crises in Haiti, the Philippines, India and Nepal, among others. This article uses frameworks from the field of geography to consider how the exclusion (and move towards inclusion) of sexual and gender minorities in DRR. While there is an increasing attention to sexual and gender minorities in geography literature, there has not been a corresponding increase in DRR policy and practice. The authors then provide a roadmap for the way the field of geography can play a role in increasing the inclusivity of DRR.

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"Bringing geographies of sexualities and disaster studies together has important insights on policies and practices, both in the context of DRR and in wider situations. Together, they draw attention to the diversity of sexual and gender identities, beyond man/woman and heterosexual/homosexual binaries, in both theory and practice."

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This article considers the implications of the absence of sexual and gender minorities from DRR planning, research, and response literature. The article first provides an overview of the existing (limited) body of work on sexual and gender minority experiences in disaster settings, including work on crises in Haiti, the Philippines, India and Nepal, among others. This article uses frameworks from the field of geography to consider how the exclusion (and move towards inclusion) of sexual and gender minorities in DRR. While there is an increasing attention to sexual and gender minorities in geography literature, there has not been a corresponding increase in DRR policy and practice. The authors then provide a roadmap for the way the field of geography can play a role in increasing the inclusivity of DRR.