ER 55 Literature review on sexuality and poverty: Sexuality, Poverty and Law

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This literature review is relevant to humanitarian practitioners because it provides a well-rounded analysis on the existing structure of development, policy and livelihoods. This gives humanitarian practitioners a solid understanding of the ways in which the needs of sexual and gender minorities are currently being addressed and the gap that needs to be filled.

Development programmes in LMIC are often built around certain assumptions about sexuality and gender, leaving large portions of people such as those within the LGBTI community and often sex workers, excluded from these efforts and the benefits in which they bring. The aim of this literature review is to provide an analysis on the existing literature and the extent of which they assess the role of sexuality in poverty in LMIC; to apply a “web of poverty” to the existing literature, and to provide an overview of the way in which policy in LMIC plays a role in marginalising people through its specific elements.  While there is existing literature in LMIC surrounding law, poverty and sexuality, it generally has a focus on HIV/AIDS prevention and more often than not lacks attention on issues such as social and economic depravation and marginalisation due to sexual identity and gender diversity. This literature review addresses these issues in its findings and highlights the importance of addressing these gaps within the existing literature.

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"Sexual minorities experience a range of interlocked and mutually reinforcing Insecurities at the individual, familial, and local community levels that are (re)created and reinforced by state and social institutions."

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Development programmes in LMIC are often built around certain assumptions about sexuality and gender, leaving large portions of people such as those within the LGBTI community and often sex workers, excluded from these efforts and the benefits in which they bring. The aim of this literature review is to provide an analysis on the existing literature and the extent of which they assess the role of sexuality in poverty in LMIC; to apply a “web of poverty” to the existing literature, and to provide an overview of the way in which policy in LMIC plays a role in marginalising people through its specific elements.  While there is existing literature in LMIC surrounding law, poverty and sexuality, it generally has a focus on HIV/AIDS prevention and more often than not lacks attention on issues such as social and economic depravation and marginalisation due to sexual identity and gender diversity. This literature review addresses these issues in its findings and highlights the importance of addressing these gaps within the existing literature.